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A large part of my husband’s income is cash and is never reported. How do I ensure I get what I deserve?

The general rule in a Florida divorce is that the court considers and divides up the “marital” property of the ex-spouses and that the non-marital property of each party remains with the spouse that owns that particular property. In dividing up the marital property, the court is expected to be guided by principles of equity, making sure that the marital property division treats both spouses in a fair but not necessarily in an exactly similar manner. Although a property division might not necessarily be 50/50, the property division should be such that each party is treated fairly and exits the divorce with a similar amount of the marital estate. As opposed to community property states, Florida is an equitable distribution jurisdiction. That means we start with a presumption of a 50/50 split but then apply hundreds of rules in an effort to make the division fairer.

Florida Statute 61.075 describes what constitutes marital property.

In a proceeding for dissolution of marriage, in addition to all other remedies available to a court to do equity between the parties, or in a proceeding for disposition of assets following a dissolution of marriage by a court which lacked jurisdiction over the absent spouse or lacked jurisdiction to dispose of the assets, the court shall set apart to each spouse that spouse’s nonmarital assets and liabilities, and in distributing the marital assets and liabilities between the parties, the court must begin with the premise that the distribution should be equal, unless there is a justification for an unequal distribution based on all relevant factors, including:

(a) The contribution to the marriage by each spouse, including contributions to the care and education of the children and services as homemaker.

(b) The economic circumstances of the parties.

(c) The duration of the marriage.

(d) Any interruption of personal careers or educational opportunities of either party.

(e) The contribution of one spouse to the personal career or educational opportunity of the other spouse.

(f) The desirability of retaining any asset, including an interest in a business, corporation, or professional practice, intact and free from any claim or interference by the other party.

(g) The contribution of each spouse to the acquisition, enhancement, and production of income or the improvement of, or the incurring of liabilities to, both the marital assets and the nonmarital assets of the parties.

(h) The desirability of retaining the marital home as a residence for any dependent child of the marriage, or any other party, when it would be equitable to do so, it is in the best interest of the child or that party, and it is financially feasible for the parties to maintain the residence until the child is emancipated or until exclusive possession is otherwise terminated by a court of competent jurisdiction. In making this determination, the court shall first determine if it would be in the best interest of the dependent child to remain in the marital home; and, if not, whether other equities would be served by giving any other party exclusive use and possession of the marital home.

(i) The intentional dissipation, waste, depletion, or destruction of marital assets after the filing of the petition or within 2 years prior to the filing of the petition.

(j) Any other factors necessary to do equity and justice between the parties.

For divorce assistance, contact the Divorce Attorney Tampa for your Free Consultation at (813) 336-3616.

The information provided is for your reference only, is not intended to be advice, and should not be construed as such. The information provided or legal statutes may change at any time, and we are not accountable for the accuracy of this information. Use of this website or information provided does not constitute a client-attorney relationship. Please contact us for legal assistance with your specific question or need.